16 Nov 2015

Eating Tagine Meat in Morocco!

As most Moroccans, I guess we eat more beef in my house than any type of meat, with chicken queuing close behind, after comes fish, and sea food, then a once a week lamb in Fridays couscous, and to be honest I can't remember the last time I fixed veal, but I probably will be posting a tagine veal soon.

10 May 2015

My first ebook about Moroccan Tattagint or Tagine Soussi!

I am happy to announce that my first eBook about Moroccan tagine is ready.  Below you can read part of its introduction.  It includes 10 delicious tagines' recipes, all from Souss region in the south of Morocco.  I have just realised that the process of writing an ebook itself takes longer than expected because I miss some key technical information. My generation grows up with paper book and this new technology of ebooks is completely alien to me. I would like to thank my son Kamal for his technical support and help throughout this whole process. Thank you again son!

3 May 2015

Honey/Date Mahrash - Moroccan Honey/Date Bread - Mahrach aux dattes et miel-Pain Marocain!

This is Honey/Date Mahrash, very popular to be served during Ramadan in some southern Imazighen villages. This is not quite a “quick” bread, yet easy to make if you have the patience of a home baker. The most taxing part of making this bread is chopping the dates, then place them in a saucepan on a low heat, adding some honey and orange blossom water. Once cooled, this mixture is to be transferred to the Mahrash dough to make the bread.

19 Apr 2015

Red-White Cake - Happy Birthday Raissa!

Very light and soft sponge meskouta cake with a sweet marriage of orange powder and vanilla flavouring. Three layers tall, romantic, and completely covered in mascarpone and vanilla frosting. Happy birthday Raissa!

15 Apr 2015

Naughty Chocolaty-Sweety Cake - Happy Birthday Leo!

Children can give us bizarre ideas how to decorate a cake. When Leo visited us last week, and I was asked to make him a cake for his 8th birthday, I said "How do you want your cake to look like Leo?".  "Lot of chocolate and sweeties please!" he replied with a big smile and shiny eyes.  Leo is such a happy lovely boy, very sociable with a sweet constant question asking habit that I love.

I made this 3 layers chocolate sponge cake all decorated with sweets and chocolate ganache, I thought this would be the perfect cake for him, and now it's ready to be picked by Leo's mum.. Happy birthday sweetheart!

10 Apr 2015

Cuisine of Figuig or Ifiyyey : Aghrom Anabsal or Anabssale or N'lebsal / Onion Bread

Figuig is a stunning little town in eastern Morocco near the Atlas Mountains.  The Imazighen locals call their town "Ifiyyey" which is an adjective derived from the verb "Afey" and which means "Cover". Figuig or Ifiyyey has the largest palmeraie  in Morocco with over 150,000 palm trees and I was told that the tall graceful palms are male trees vs female ones which are shorter.

29 Mar 2015

A tribute to My Father - This month, 10 years of my life without my dad!

When I visited my father in December of 2004 in Casablanca, he was diagnosed with stage 4 lung cancer. He was weak, very jaundice with skin and whites of eyes were yellow as well.  I was so shocked by his appearance that I started crying as I hugged him. I sat down next to him with my face buried in his shoulders as I cried my eyes out.  I could feel his weak hands, touching my hair, and rubbing my back, whispering to me out of the side of his mouth in the way he always did : “Matbkich abnti, rani bikhir", which means: “My daughter, please don't cry, I am fine”.

28 Mar 2015

Chocolate-Strawberry Cake - Happy Birthday Sabrina!

Finally, I put that cake in the box, ready to go! It took me two good hours to finish it. Such a torture to bake and smell a chocolate cake but not be allowed to touch it, it was meant for someone else's Birthday. The torture was getting worse when it came to finalise its decoration, and being a mad chocolaty myself, I let my imagination coming up with ways to fill this cake with a layer upon layer of chocolate and strawberry goodness. In total I sliced 4 layers, it was supposed to be a sky-high four-layered chocolate-strawberry cake, problem though, I ran out of chocolate icing, so I decided to stop at the 3rd layer.

16 Mar 2015

Pour avoir de beaux enfants donnez-leur du LAIT GUIGOZ / Halwat L' Ghoraf” or “ Halwat Guigoz / حلوة الغراف

I'm beginning to believe that I was born in the right place and on the right time, because I would have starved if I was born any earlier when sweets and cookies were a luxury! Blogging about food brings a lot of my childhood memories, and this post is one of them. My children always ask me what is in a dessert I am about to serve, but they never ask me how it got its name and frankly they don't care as long as it tastes good.  The origins of cookies/sweets in Kingdom of Morocco are as interesting as the sweets themselves, and this is one special 60s/80s cookies, which deserves food blog attention.

20 Feb 2015

Fkas Mal7 or 9at3a ( قطعة / فقاس مالح ) Moroccan Colourful Crackers /Moroccan Version of Indian Punjabi Mathri!!

It's time to nominate a better name for these Moroccan savoury cookies, I'm happy to call them “Moroccan colourful crackers" or "Moroccan version of Indian Punjabi Pathri".  The word FKAS pronouced as /FKKAːSS/ and here the letter "K" stands for the Arabic letter "ق" which is non-existent in English alphabet . The word “FKAS“ means, in Moroccan darija, “annoying or irritating", and my mum told me "FKAS" got its name due to the fact that it's notoriously time-consuming, difficult to make, to be baked twice, to be allowed to rest for over 24 hours, then cut thinly into diagonal slices with high precision to get the right thickness of fkas biscuit, and this has always been the old technique used to make either sweet or savoury version of fkas.

5 Feb 2015

In memory of my mum! Khbiza O Zbida! Bread and Butter Sandwich!

That was my favourite childhood sandwich, known in Morocco as “Khbiza O Zbida” = {Khbiza means Bread and Zbida means traditional butter}. Nothing fancy, only bread and traditional butter, but I was always delighted when my mum got to make one for me. This sandwich goes only with one type of bread, the yeasty goodness of fresh, hot home-made bread. I liked mine to get nice and dark crust and the butter had to be oozing out.

1 Jan 2015

Moroccan Cookies / Cakes! Dwaz Atay / دواز أتاي

Moroccan Cookies / Cakes!
Dwaz Atay  /   دواز أتاي  

In Morocco, there are a variety of special cookies and biscuits, all are a wonderful luxury treat for any time! Generally, these Moroccan cookies speak of home and are produced from natural ingredients, using no artificial colours or flavours and are served with hot fresh mint tea and this is why we call them in Morocco "Dwaz Atay"  which means = Cookies that are accompanied by tea. Serving Moroccan tea with rich cookies is widely used throughout the whole Kingdom, and it could be after a meal, or after school, or for an afternoon tea, or simply for the fact it is the weekend, or for any occasion, either special or a family reunion.

You've been warned, this is the show-off territory in Moroccan Cuisine! Though most of home-made Dwaz Atay recipes are simple, however they are meant to make friends, guests and family members "Wowed" as soon as they take their first bite! So we absolutely want to impress everyone who tastes them, and this is the reason why an authentic Moroccan recipe will focus on the combination of  "Great flavour Taste" with "Great-Looking"!

22 Nov 2014

Kingdom of Morocco, country of varied culture!

What you need to know before visiting Morocco!

King and Queen of Morocco

                      Imazighen Flag           National Morocco Flag

1.What is Morocco and who are the Moroccans?

I do love my country for all its faults and virtues!  Lots of my blog readers sent me emails asking if Morocco is a perfect place for tourism?  I don't think there is such a place called "perfect country".  If you decide to travel abroad, the choice of the place will depend on your expectations, planning and goals. Are you an adventure traveller? or comfort-five-stars tourist? or are you looking for long sabbatical travel?  The most common questions I've received by e-mails or via private chat in Google or Facebook are:

20 Nov 2014

Ramadan in Kingdom of Morocco ! What is Ramadan and when is Ramadan?

I often receive emails from my blog readers asking if it is ok to visit Morocco during Ramadan and what this celebration exactly means, and how long it lasts etc..., so I have decided to write this article to talk about Ramadan in Morocco, hoping it will be helpful and answer all your questions.

19 Nov 2014

Top Two (2) Feel-Home Food for Ramadan in Morocco: Sellou or Slilo, a Unique Unbaked Moroccan Sweet for Ramadan!

I always spend my two weeks before Ramadan baking up a storm, but this year is exceptional! I've received a few orders from my blog readers and friends, willing to buy my chabakia and sellou, and this has been the longest uninterrupted two weeks pre-Ramadan ever.  I spent most of my time between work and baking, a lot of baking, but guess what? I loved it, it was a pure delight to me!

25 Sep 2014

عَقْدَةْ اللّوز/Homemade Almond Paste/Pâte d'Amandes!

Almonds are the most commonly used nuts in Morocco and where would Moroccan pastry be without them? The almonds, either whole or sliced or toasted or fried or ground with skin on, or blanched, are a staple in Moroccan dishes, as well as dessert pastes.

Almond and amlou paste are food pastes made from ground, dry almonds, and both versions are very popular in Morocco.  Amlou Paste = أَمْلُو uses ground, dry almonds with skin on, all mixed with Argan oil and pure honey.  Whereas, the almond paste, known in Moroccan language as "3a9dat Louz" = (عَقْدَةْ اللّوز), uses ground, dry, blanched almonds (skin off), and it is widely used as a filling in most moroccan pastries.

11 Sep 2014

European Macarons /Macarons Européens

The first time I tasted macaroons, I was in USA.  They are very delicious cookies, known as American coconut macaroon.  Then a few years ago, I went to France, it was my first trip to Paris.  Wowww, I still remember all those oh-la-la-so-French, exceptionally delicate almond meringue sandwich cookies in many Patisseries windows. I literally gasped when I saw those incredible macarons and I couldn't resist them! So creative, stunning and fashionable. Everything about them sounded perfect : the colour, taste, flavour, filling, etc .......

My attempt to make different flavours of French Macarons!

Last week, I prepared these macarons for my friend daughter first birthday . As you know, I made my first macarons two weeks ago, Orange Flavour Macarons RECIPE HERE; and looking at these pictures I am posting now, I am afraid to admit I might be hooked!

French Heart-Shaped and Dark Macarons/Macarons Français Coeurs et Noirs For Mactweets Challenge!

I was planning to make these macarons for Mac Attack 3 last week, but I was hesitant for one reason: THE WEATHER.  Last week the weather was horrible; it was pouring and snowing outside, then I decided to start making my first batch of heart-shaped macarons.  I chose pink powder colour.  I never tried this shape before, it was a big challenge for me!  However, I was disappointed with the filling, because the butter cream I bought, as you may see in the picture, breaks.  It must be made with margarine instead of real butter.  This will teach me to make my own butter cream next time.

French, Saffron, Curcuma Macarons For Mac Attack 5!

First I would like to wish you all a very happy Mother's Day!  Many countries of the world celebrate their own Mother's Day at different times throughout the year.  In UK, it is today, March 14, 2010 : the Mothering Sunday Date.  UK holds the prestige of being the first country in the world to celebrate that very special day.

French Macarons Rings / Bagues Macarons Français for MacAttack!

I had specially made these Macarons for Mactweets February Challenge that Deeba of Passionate about baking and Jamie of Life's a feast are hosting. This month theme is "Valentine Special"  Macarons. 

French Coffee Macarons/Macarons Français Au Café/For Mac Attack 7

This month's challenge at Mac attack is "MacTell Me A Story!" and our favourite book as a child. Mine,  was "One thousand and one nights"‎.  I basically grew up on this book.

French Chocolate and Almond Macarons / Macarons Français aux Chocolat et Amandes/Mac Attack #18

My love for chocolate gets me back to Mactweet attack! I really heart chocolate and my favourite is Dark Chocolate with Almonds! And who doesn’t love the combination of chocolate and almonds?  I think chocolate is one of the most mysterious sweets and so many questions were raised about the industry of chocolate, its consistency, texture, flavour, its secrets, etc.....  I served those macarons on Chocolate Dessert Cups with Strawberry and Moroccan Almond Briwat or Triangles! So delicious!

Violet and Mint French Macarons / Macarons Français Violets et à la Menthe

I should have posted these a long time ago. I made those mint-violet macarons quite a few weeks ago, but I haven't had the time to post them. Whenever I decide to make macarons, I always seem to make them after 8h00 pm or when it's raining or worst, on a hot humid day. When I decide to make macarons, nothing could change my mind.  So I decided to make these treats, so be it.

Another day, another macaron!

For recipe, I always use my usual recipe adapted from La cuisine de Mercotte...

Bûche au chocolat blanc et orange / Gâteau roulé!


-Gâteau roulé préparé en avance.

- Comme garniture, j'ai mis la crème au chocolat blanc dont voici la recette Cliquez pour lire la recette: Crème au chocolat blanc!

-Pour décorer, fleurs de pâte à sucre que j'ai préparées en avance dont voici le lien Cliquez pour lire la recette: Fleur faite à base de pâte de fleurs / Finger flower made with Sugar Florist Paste

Gâteau aux carottes, Spécialité Nord-Américaine! / Carrot Cake, North American Specialty!


- 225 gr farine self-raising (si vous utilisez farine normale: il faut y ajouter à la recette 1 c à thé de levure chimique et 1/4 c à thé de bicarbonate de soude. / 225 gr self-raising four, should you use normal pastry flour , add 1 tea spoon of baking powder and 1/4 tea spoon of baking soda.  Self- raising flour has sodium bicarbonate or similar in it so no need to put baking powder 

- 250 gr de sucre semoule / 250 gr caster sugar

- 1/4 c à thé de levure chimique / 1/4 teaspoon baking powder

- 1 c à soupe de cannelle moulue / 1 tablespoon ground cinnamon

- 2 oeufs de taille moyenne / 2 medium eggs

- 170 ml de l'huile / 170 ml oil

- 2 carrottes râpées / 2 grated carrots

- 100 grde noix / 100 gr chopped walnuts

- 125 ml de compote de pommes / 125 ml apple compote

Raspberry and White Chocolate Mousse Charlotte / Charlotte à la mousse au chocolat blanc et framboises

This charlotte double mousse recipe is an easy variation of the elegant fanciful French Cake.  Instead of lady fingers, I used 2 rolled cakes, sliced and soaked in a raspberry syrup.  You might use any recipe of a rich chocolate and raspberry mousse as a filling, and you have to chill it for several hours prior to serving.  As for the presentation, I didn't need to add anything special or any elaborated decoration, surprisingly it turned out nice and tasted delicious!

Pièce montée / Croquembouche for DB Challenge of May 2010

The May 2010 Daring Bakers’ challenge was hosted by Cat of Little Miss Cupcake. Cat challenged everyone to make a croquembouche.  The recipes she chose come from Peter Kump’s Baking School in Manhattan and were originally created by famed pastry chef, Nick Malgieri.
We were asked to make our own pate a choux (puff pastry) and crème patissière and the piece montée needs to be a mounted structure with some height to it.

The Australia's National Dish: Pavlova!

They call it the Australia's National Dish, named after Anna Pavlova, a Russian dancer, one of the finest classical ballet dancers in history.  Since I'm a big fan of meringue, I thought about it for a while and decided that I could make a Pavlova myself and why not?   I knew this would take sometime and practice, but nothing could stop me from making it.

I tried some recipes, trying to reproduce the perfect texture of Pavlova but failed to succeed.  There was always something wrong with my meringue: either shrinks or puffs over then deflates once out of the oven etc....  Luckily,  there are so many handy tips to meringue online, most of them suggest to add some cream tartar in the white eggs, bring egg whites to room temperature to ensure volume when beating, and turn the oven off and leave the meringues inside the closed oven,  etc....  Taking all these tips into account, finally my Pavlova turned out nice and delicious but there is still room for improvement. I added a touch of sesame seeds at the end before baking the meringue, I just can't help it, I love too much these little golden seeds!
I'm sending this post to 


-5 medium egg white, at room temperature.  Mine were frozen, I removed them from the freezer in the morning and started to beat my meringue at about 6h pm  / 5 blanc d'oeuf taille moyenne à température ambiante. Les miens étaient congelés, je les ai sortis du congélateur le matin et j'ai commencé à faire monter ma meringue vers 18h.

-100 gr caster sugar / 100 gr sucre semoule

-2 tablespoons icing sugar / 2 c à soupe sucre glace

-Pinch of cream of tartar / Une pincée de crème de tartre.

- 3 tablespoons cornflour / 3 c à soupe de maïzena ou Amidon de maïs.
(Cornflour in the UK = cornstarch in the USA = Amidon de maïs in Quebec = Maïzena in Morocco)

-1 tablespoon golden sesame seeds / 1 c à soupe de graines de sésames.

For the topping: / Pour la garniture:

-Whipping cream / La crème fouettée

-My children's favourite fruits / Les fruits préférés de mes enfants

My First Tiramisu Attempt... / Daring Bakers February 2010 Challenge

I have no more reason to postpone making Tiramisu. This is my first Tiramisu and I'm sure it will not be the last one. It tastes really good!  When I read the challenge for Februrary was Tiramisu, I had two immediate thoughts: first I was so happy because I love Tiramisu so much but never tried it before, and the second thought was "oupps, this will not be an easy challenge for me!".  I was lucky since I had one week off from work, so I managed to complete the task a few days ago instead of last minute as I was expecting.  It took me almost 4 days to finish my Tiramisu, first I started making those lovely savoiardi biscuits, then mascarpone cheese, zabaglione, and finally pastry cream and whipped cream.

The Daring Kitchen

The February 2010 Daring Bakers’ challenge was brought to us by Aparna of My Diverse Kitchen and Deeba of Passionate About Baking and they chose to challenge Daring Bakers’ everywhere to bake and assemble a Tiramisu from scratch. They chose Baltimore pastry chef Carminantonio Iannaccone’s version of tiramisu and recipes from The Washington Post, Cordon Bleu at Home and Baking Obsession. Their recipe called for the following components:
-Whipped cream
-Pastry cream
-Savoiardi biscuits
And we were asked to make every component of Tiramisu with the given recipes. I just followed the recipes instructions, they are well detailed and easy to follow.  Thank you Deeba and Aparna for this lovely challenge.  I really enjoyed it.
Here is the recipe of Tiramisu as given to us by Deeba and Aparna:

  • A double boiler (a stainless steel bowl that fits inside a large saucepan/ pot without touching the bottom will do)
  • Two or three large mixing bowls
  • Whisk
  • A medium sized heavy bottomed pan
  • Fine meshed strainer (to remove lumps from pastry cream, if any)
  • Electric mixer, hand held
  • Serving dish (or dishes) of choice (8" by 8" should be fine)
  • Spatula for folding and spoons as required
  • Plastic wrap/ clingfilm
  • Baking sheets
  • Parchment paper or nonstick liners
  • Pastry bag (can be disposable)
  • Plain 3/4" pastry bag tip or cut the end of pastry bag to this size (If you don’t have a pastry bag and/or tips, you can use a Ziploc bag with the corner snipped off)
  • Oven
  • Cooling rack
  • Thin-bladed spatula for removing ladyfinger biscuits from the baking sheets
  • Instant-read thermometer (optional)
  • Strainer
  • Cheesecloth or cotton napkin for draining mascarpone
  • Fine-mesh strainer for shaking cocoa powder on tiramisu

(Recipe source: Carminantonio's Tiramisu from The Washington Post, July 11 2007 )
This recipe makes 6 servings.

Recipe, adapted from  The Daring Kitchen


(I took pictures while making thes delicious biscuits)

(Source: Recipe from Cordon Bleu At Home)
This recipe makes approximately 24 big ladyfingers or 45 small (2 1/2" to 3" long) ladyfingers.

(I put some cream of tartar once the whites are foamy and sprinkled some caster sugar over the biscuits as well as the confectioner sugar.  In fact, I put more caster sugar than the confectioner one.  I used white eggs kept at room temperature for a few hours.) 


-3 eggs, separated
-6 tablespoons /75gms granulated sugar
-3/4 cup/95gms cake flour, sifted (or 3/4 cup all purpose flour + 2 tbsp corn starch)
-6 tablespoons /50gms confectioner's sugar,


1-Preheat your oven to 350 F (175 C) degrees, then lightly brush 2 baking sheets with oil or softened butter and line with parchment paper.

2-Beat the egg whites using a hand held electric mixer until stiff peaks form. Gradually add granulate sugar and continue beating until the egg whites become stiff again, glossy and smooth.
3-In a small bowl, beat the egg yolks lightly with a fork and fold them into the meringue, using a wooden spoon.
4-Sift the flour over this mixture and fold gently until just mixed.
5- It is important to fold very gently and not overdo the folding. Otherwise the batter would deflate and lose volume resulting in ladyfingers which are flat and not spongy.
6-Fit a pastry bag with a plain tip (or just snip the end off; you could also use a Ziploc bag) and fill with the batter. Pipe the batter into 5" long and 3/4" wide strips leaving about 1" space in between the strips. Sprinkle half the confectioner's sugar over the ladyfingers and wait for 5 minutes. The sugar will pearl or look wet and glisten. Now sprinkle the remaining sugar. This helps to give the ladyfingers their characteristic crispness.
7-Hold the parchment paper in place with your thumb and lift one side of the baking sheet and gently tap it on the work surface to remove excess sprinkled sugar.

8-Bake the ladyfingers for 10 minutes, then rotate the sheets and bake for another 5 minutes or so until the puff up, turn lightly golden brown and are still soft.
9-Allow them to cool slightly on the sheets for about 5 minutes and then remove the ladyfingers from the baking sheet with a metal spatula while still hot, and cool on a rack.

10-Store them in an airtight container till required. They should keep for 2 to 3 weeks.

For the zabaglione:

(Instead of Marsala wine, I mixed 60ml of water water with 2 tablespoon of freeze and dried instant coffee)
-2 large egg yolks
-3 tablespoons sugar/50gms
-1/4 cup/60ml Marsala wine (or port or coffee)
-1/4 teaspoon/ 1.25ml vanilla extract
-1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest

For the zabaglione:

Heat water in a double boiler. If you don’t have a double boiler, place a pot with about an inch of water in it on the stove. Place a heat-proof bowl in the pot making sure the bottom does not touch the water.
In a large mixing bowl (or stainless steel mixing bowl), mix together the egg yolks, sugar, the Marsala (or espresso/ coffee), vanilla extract and lemon zest. Whisk together until the yolks are fully blended and the mixture looks smooth.

Transfer the mixture to the top of a double boiler or place your bowl over the pan/ pot with simmering water. Cook the egg mixture over low heat, stirring constantly, for about 8 minutes or until it resembles thick custard. It may bubble a bit as it reaches that consistency.
Let cool to room temperature and transfer the zabaglione to a bowl. Cover and refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight, until thoroughly chilled.
After 4 hours
For the vanilla pastry cream:

(I forgot to take a picture of my pastry cream.  This recipe is perfect and I will use it anytime I need Pastry Cream).

-1/4 cup/55gms sugar
-1 tablespoon/8gms all purpose flour
-1/2 teaspoon finely grated lemon zest
-1/2 teaspoon/ 2.5ml vanilla extract
-1 large egg yolk
-3/4 cup/175ml whole milk

For the pastry cream:

Mix together the sugar, flour, lemon zest and vanilla extract in a medium heavy-bottomed saucepan. To this add the egg yolk and half the milk. Whisk until smooth. Now place the saucepan over low heat and cook, stirring constantly to prevent the mixture from curdling.  Add the remaining milk a little at a time, still stirring constantly. After about 12 minutes the mixture will be thick, free of lumps and beginning to bubble. (If you have a few lumps, don’t worry. You can push the cream through a fine-mesh strainer.)
Transfer the pastry cream to a bowl and cool to room temperature. Cover with plastic film and refrigerate at least 4 hours or overnight, until thoroughly chilled.

For the whipped cream:

-1 cup/235ml chilled heavy cream (we used 25%)
-1/4 cup/55gms sugar
-1/2 teaspoon/ 2.5ml vanilla extract

For the whipped cream:

Combine the cream, sugar and vanilla extract in a mixing bowl. Beat with an electric hand mixer or immersion blender until the mixture holds stiff peaks. Set aside.


(Source: Vera’s Recipe for Homemade Mascarpone Cheese)
This recipe makes 12oz/ 340gm of mascarpone cheese

(At first I was intimidated by this recipe, but having no choice, I gave it a try and was not sure how it will turn out.  The texture was perfect, so delicious! I was really pleased!).

474ml (approx. 500ml)/ 2 cups whipping (36 %) pasteurized (not ultra-pasteurized), preferably organic cream (between 25% to 36% cream will do)
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice


Bring 1 inch of water to a boil in a wide skillet. Reduce the heat to medium-low so the water is barely simmering. Pour the cream into a medium heat-resistant bowl, then place the bowl into the skillet. Heat the cream, stirring often, to 190 F. If you do not have a thermometer, wait until small bubbles keep trying to push up to the surface.

It will take about 15 minutes of delicate heating. Add the lemon juice and continue heating the mixture, stirring gently, until the cream curdles. Do not expect the same action as you see during ricotta cheese making. All that the whipping cream will do is become thicker, like a well-done crème anglaise. It will cover a back of your wooden spoon thickly. You will see just a few clear whey streaks when you stir. Remove the bowl from the water and let cool for about 20 minutes. Meanwhile, line a sieve with four layers of dampened cheesecloth and set it over a bowl. Transfer the mixture into the lined sieve. Do not squeeze the cheese in the cheesecloth or press on its surface (be patient, it will firm up after refrigeration time). Once cooled completely, cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate (in the sieve) overnight or up to 24 hours.
Vera’s notes: The first time I made mascarpone I had all doubts if it’d been cooked enough, because of its custard-like texture. Have no fear, it will firm up beautifully in the fridge, and will yet remain lusciously creamy.
Keep refrigerated and use within 3 to 4 days.
To assemble the tiramisu:

-2 cups/470ml brewed espresso, warmed
-1 teaspoon/5ml rum extract (optional)
-1/2 cup/110gms sugar
-1/3 cup/75gms mascarpone cheese
-36 savoiardi/ ladyfinger biscuits (you may use less)
-2 tablespoons/30gms unsweetened cocoa powder

To assemble the tiramisu:

Have ready a rectangular serving dish (about 8" by 8" should do) or one of your choice.
Mix together the warm espresso, rum extract and sugar in a shallow dish, whisking to mix well. Set aside to cool.
In a large bowl, beat the mascarpone cheese with a spoon to break down the lumps and make it smooth. This will make it easier to fold. Add the prepared and chilled zabaglione and pastry cream, blending until just combined. Gently fold in the whipped cream. Set this cream mixture aside.
Now to start assembling the tiramisu.
Workings quickly, dip 12 of the ladyfingers in the sweetened espresso, about 1 second per side. They should be moist but not soggy. Immediately transfer each ladyfinger to the platter, placing them side by side in a single row. You may break a lady finger into two, if necessary, to ensure the base of your dish is completely covered.
Spoon one-third of the cream mixture on top of the ladyfingers, then use a rubber spatula or spreading knife to cover the top evenly, all the way to the edges.
Repeat to create 2 more layers, using 12 ladyfingers and the cream mixture for each layer. Clean any spilled cream mixture; cover carefully with plastic wrap and refrigerate the tiramisu overnight.
To serve, carefully remove the plastic wrap and sprinkle the tiramisu with cocoa powder using a fine-mesh strainer or decorate as you please. Cut into individual portions and serve.

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